Willem Volkersz, Silent City
Willem Volkersz, Silent City, 2002/14, Neon, wood, and acrylic and latex paint, 73 x 99 x 6 inches
Victoria Haven, Jump Cuts, 2014, Ink on Bristol vellum, vinyl text on wall, 67 x 222 inches
Lead Pencil Studio, Afforest, 2015, Charcoal, graphite, ink and paint on paper, 73 ½ x 96 ½ inches
Dana Lynn Louis, Clearing (installation view), 2014, Mixed media, Photo: Dana Lynn Louis
Helen O’Toole, Mary Larkin’s Bottom, 2013, 100 x 156 inches, Oil on canvas (diptych)
Akio Takamori, Yellow Mountain 2015, Stoneware with underglazes, 17 1/2 x 25 1/2 x 13 1/2 inches
Samantha Wall, Flayed, 2011, Conté crayon, charcoal, and graphite on paper, 84 x 72 inches

2016 Contemporary Northwest Art Awards

Feb 13, 2016 – May 8, 2016

The Museum’s fourth biennial awards exhibition, 2016 Contemporary Northwest Art Awards features eight outstanding artists including a two-person artist’s collaborative. Four of the eight artists are immigrants, coming to the Northwest from Asia and Europe and contributing to the exhibition’s conceptual strength with a fresh view of America. Works in the exhibition address global and regional humanist issues —prejudice, belonging, war, the evolution of power, omnipresent technology, and the environment. Ranging from large-scale installations to intimate ceramic portraits, the multimedia exhibition showcases works in combinations of neon, video, glass, drawing, painting, and clay with innovative approaches to both new and traditional media.At the opening reception one artist will receive the $10,000 Arlene Schnitzer prize selected by the Museum’s curatorial staff. From nomination to final prize, the biennial awards process delivers a two-fold benefit: It allows the Portland Art Museum to identify a number of the Northwest’s exceptional talents, and it provides the museum with a far deeper understanding of the new work taking place in the region by both established and emerging artists. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalog, artists’ lectures and other exhibit related programs.Bonnie Laing-Malcolmson, The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Curator of Northwest Art, and invited curatorial advisor Jessica Hunter-Larsen, curator of IDEA Space, Interdisciplinary Experimental Arts, at Colorado College, received over 200 nominations from respected regional arts professionals of outstanding contemporary artists from Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming. Nominees were selected on the basis of quality, innovation, relevance to community or global issues, continuity of vision and dedication to studio practice. Hunter-Larsen and Laing-Malcolmson reviewed the applications to select 24 four finalists, from which the group of seven award winners was chosen.

Organized by the Portland Art Museum and curated by Bonnie Laing-Malcolmson, The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Curator of Northwest Art.


Victoria Haven, Seattle, Washington
Using drawing and video, Haven employs words and geometric spatial relationships to illustrate the fragmented bombardment of technology on the human psyche in the new millennium. With language and mixed media, she binds together two- and three-dimensional imagery to create elegant modernist objects that suggest unanswered questions.

Haven received a BFA degree from the University of Washington, Seattle and an MFA from Goldsmith College, University of London, United Kingdom. Her work has been exhibited at Seattle Art Museum; Drawing Room, London; Planthouse, New York; Frye Art Museum, Seattle; and Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, Oregon, among other venues. She has been included in numerous group exhibitions nationally and internationally. Haven has won many awards and her work is included in numerous public and private collections.

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Lead Pencil Studio, Seattle, Washington
Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo use video, sculpture, drawing, installation and photography to reveal spatial qualities of the built environment that influence human behavior. This combination of styles expands the understanding of the constructed surface, which scripts a large portion of human movement and perception.

Lead Pencil Studio is a collaborative between Seattle architects Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo,both graduates of the University of Oregon College of Architecture and Allied Arts. Lead Pencil Studio has been included in exhibitions nationally and internationally and has received awards, grants, and residencies including: Year in Review, Americans for the Arts, Washington D.C.; John Michael Kohler Arts Center Residency; New York Prize Fellowship, Van Alen Institute; MacDowell Colony Artists Residency, New Hampshire; Rome Prize, American Academy, Italy; and a Creative Capital Foundation Visual Arts grant, New York.

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Dana Lynn Louis, Portland, Oregon
Louis is inspired by the human body and its connection to timeless and fascinating systems of the natural and constructed worlds—linking time, space, and energy through dynamic multimedia installations. Creating spaces with intimate and large-scale drawings, light projections, and sculptural objects, she uses glass, light, and shadow to achieve a glitteringly magical environment.

Louis earned a BS in Studio Art and Education, University of Wisconsin, Madison and an MFA from Ohio State University, Columbus. Her solo exhibitions include: Hoffman Gallery, Lewis and Clark College, Portland, Oregon; Kuhl Gallery, Oakland, California; Gallery 111, Sausalito; The Art Gym at Marylhurst University, Oregon; and Hopkins Hall Gallery, Ohio State University, Columbus. Louis has executed commissioned projects including: Oregon State Hospital, Junction; TriMet Light Rail, Portland; Ann Sacks, New York; Northgate Library, Seattle; Mary Bridge Children’s Hospital, Tacoma and Oregon Convention Center, Portland.

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Helen O’Toole, Seattle, Washington
O’Toole creates a prolonged moment where the painting’s vast space evokes an image with a resonating emotional depth. Metaphorically employing the moody landscape of rural Ireland, she channels a deep-seated pain and misery resulting from a past lived amidst a compilation of grudges, suspicion, and violence.

O’Toole lives is a professor at the University of Washington. She earned a BA from National College of Art and Design, Dublin, Ireland and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has exhibited at The Hamilton Gallery, Sligo, Ireland; Linehall Art Center, Castlebar, Ireland; The Cultural Center, Chicago; Hudson D. Walker Gallery, Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown, Massachusetts; and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Awards and honors received include: a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Fellowship; a Jack and Grace Pruzan Endowed Faculty Fellowship (2013-2015), University of Washington; and The Bemis Foundation Residency, Omaha.

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Akio Takamori, Seattle, Washington
Takamori’s new, 40-foot-long, lyrically painted clay installation addresses the war torn world through the faces of its threatened children. In our contemporary society of a great mix of people, these diverse faces remind us that life begins unblemished by clashing ideologies. Additionally, a series of serene ceramic landscapes quoted from historic Japanese and European paintings provide a hopeful and contemplative view of the natural environment.

Takamori received a BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute and an MFA from New York State College of Ceramics, Alfred University. His exhibitions include: The Ariana Museum, Switzerland; Galerie Collection, Paris, France; Sint-Lucas Beeldende Kunst, Gent, Belgium; International Ceramic Studio, Kecskemet, Hungary; and Barry Friedman LTD, New York. His work is represented in collections including: Ariana Museum, Geneva, Switzerland; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; The Mint Museum of Craft and Design, North Carolina; Los Angeles County Art Museum, California; Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Museum of Contemporary Ceramic Art, Shigaraki, Japan; Museum of Art and Design, New York; Seattle Art Museum; and Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

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Willem Volkersz, Bozeman, Montana
Volkersz has an immigrant’s fascination with America. Arriving in Seattle from Amsterdam shortly after World War II, he began photographing a newly discovered landscape of billboards, vernacular architecture, and neon signs. Over time, he became fascinated with roadside art and pop culture: larger-than-life advertising figures, postcards, and travel souvenirs. Volkersz creates a charmingly critical narrative around his Dutch heritage and American citizenship.

Volkersz was awarded a BA from the University of Washington, Seattle and an MFA from Mills College, Oakland, California. He has had 45 solo exhibitions and has received numerous grants and fellowships, including The Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation, Individual Artist Grant, New York; George Sugarman Foundation Grant, Novato, California; Individual Artists Fellowship, Helena, Montana; and a Fulbright Senior Scholar Award, Washington, D.C. His work is found in collections including: Seattle Art Museum; University of the Arts, Osaka, Japan; Kansas City Art Institute; Northwest Museum of Arts And Culture, La Conner, Washington; Nanjing College of the Arts, China; Museum of Neon Art, California.

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Samantha Wall, Portland, Oregon
Wall seeks to communicate the interior emotional state that separates one’s sense of self from their body. Growing up as an ethnically diverse child in South Korea and the American South, she learned to navigate between social and cultural boundaries. Her quietly powerful work utilizes modest materials, such as graphite or charcoal, to build a supple, interlaced texture of marks which are suspended on the surface of paper.

Wall received her BFA from University of Southern Carolina, Columbia, and an MFA from Pacific Northwest College of Art, Portland. She has had solo exhibitions at Fairbanks Gallery, Oregon State University, Corvallis; The Art Gym, Marylhurst University, Oregon; Worksound, Portland, Oregon; McMaster Gallery, University of South Carolina, Columbia; and Olive Hyde Art Center, Fremont, California. She has received grants, awards and residencies including an Individual Artist Fellowship from Oregon Arts Commission; Joan Mitchell Center Residency, New Orleans; and a Hallie Ford Fellowship in the Visual Arts, Roseburg, Oregon.

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Apr
23
Fri
Epic Ephemera: Signals
Apr 23 @ 9:00 pm – 11:00 pm

Please note this program has been moved from Saturday, April 24th to Friday, April 23rd due to rain.

Mobile Projection Unit presents an outdoor digital installation series at the Portland Art Museum, reimagining space at an epic scale and unraveling hidden mythologies. The Epic Ephemera series ranges from a group screening of experimental media work rooted in ritual, sculpting canvases atop architecture to reveal the poetics of the natural world, to bringing leading pioneers of audio/video/coding to Portland through a digital portal. Epic Ephemera reinvents public space and shared experience, transcending the limitations of our screens.

SIGNALS is a collaborative project by artists Nicolas Sassoon (Vancouver, BC) and Rick Silva (Eugene, OR)  that focuses on immersive audio-visual renderings of altered seascapes. Sassoon and Silva share an  ongoing theme in their individual practices; the depiction of wilderness and natural forms through  computer imaging. Created by merging their respective fields of visual research, SIGNALS features oceanic  panoramas inhabited by unnatural substances and enigmatic structures. The project draws from sources  such as oceanographic surveys, climate studies and science-fiction to create 3D generated video works  and installations that reflect on contamination, mutation and future ecologies. This exhibition digitally maps the work onto the Museum’s courtyard and features a live soundtrack by Pulse Emitter.

 

Rick Silva
Rick Silva’s videos and installations envision near-future ecologies altered by technology and climate change. Silva was born in Brazil and lives in Eugene Oregon where he is an Associate Professor of Art at the University of Oregon. He has exhibited his work in over 20 solo and two-person exhibitions and over 100 group exhibitions, including Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, and The Centre Pompidou.
http://ricksilva.net/
https://www.instagram.com/ricksilva.jpg/
https://twitter.com/ricksilva

Nicholas Sassoon
Nicolas Sassoon’s work has long been concerned with the tensions between the pixel and the  screen, reflecting on their entanglement and materiality by integrating pixelated figures, moiré  patterns and early computer graphics into experiential displays. This focus on early computer  graphics is driven by the sculptural, material and pictorial qualities of this imagery, as well as its  limitations and its poetics. Sassoon’s work often explores the projective dimensions of screen based space, and the many relationships between computer technology and the natural world.  His research leads him to engage in cross-disciplinary projects in the fields of architecture,  electronic music, textiles, and art. Nicolas Sassoon lives and works in Vancouver BC Canada, on  the unceded lands of the Sḵwxwú7mesh (Squamish), Stó:lō and S ̱ əlílw̓ ətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil Waututh) and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Nations. His work has been exhibited across the United States, Canada and Europe.
http://www.nicolassassoon.com/
https://s-i-g-n-a-l-s.com
http://www.w-a-l-l-p-a-p-e-r-s.net/
https://twitter.com/Nicolas_Sassoon
https://www.instagram.com/nicolassassoon

Pulse Emitter
Portland-based composer Daryl Groetsch’s output under the name Pulse Emitter forms a catalog of nearly one hundred physical releases since the early ‘00s. The full scope of his wide-ranging experiments in synthesis and electronic arrangement encompasses everything from expansive new age drift exercises, to purely textural noise sculpting, to post-Berlin School cybernetic prog compositions.

Pulse Emitter approaches electronic composition from the perspective of a master craftsman, harnessing a fine-tuned sense of narrative development and a penchant for juxtaposing contrasting synth voices from far-flung corners of his arsenal of softsynths, app-based programs, and hardware instruments. While he conjures time-lapse vistas of galaxies and nebulas in our mind’s eye, the sophistication of his arrangements and the universal beauty of his harmonies pushes the lens inward on the self, resulting in a journey that is as personal and internal as it is celestial.
https://pulseemitter.com
https://pulseemitter.bandcamp.com
https://twitter.com/PulseEmitter
https://www.instagram.com/pulse_emitter/
https://www.facebook.com/pulse.emitter
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxem2CLMZkuSvHaNlmpIu6A

 

The Epic Ephemera series is supported by the Museum and Film Center’s Re:Imagine Artist Fund, an initiative expanding our commitment to supporting artists in a reimagined cultural sphere. Learn more.

Mobile Projection Unit is funded in part by the Precipice Fund, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, The Calligram Foundation, and the Regional Arts and Culture Council, Northwest Film Center, and Portland Art Museum. The Epic Ephemera exhibition is coordinated for the Portland Art Museum by Jaleesa Johnston, Program Lead and Sara Krajewski, Eichholz Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.

May
6
Thu
Artful Meditation
May 6 @ 12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Join Portland Art Museum docents for a slow looking and art focused meditation experience. This interactive virtual tour invites you to relax, rejuvenate, energize and to try and find a moment of calm. Come along as we connect and create space together for a deeper understanding of artworks on view at the museum.

This program is free and will be presented on Zoom. Closed Captioning will be available.

Join on Zoom

May
18
Tue
Art and Conversation
May 18 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

Join us on Zoom and Facebook Live

Art and Conversation is a free monthly program that occurs every third Tuesday, featuring a range of speakers from Museum curators and staff, artists and Portland-based arts organizations. Please check back for more details on what this month’s Art and Conversation topic and time will be.

May
20
Thu
Artful Meditation
May 20 @ 12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Join Portland Art Museum docents for a slow looking and art focused meditation experience. This interactive virtual tour invites you to relax, rejuvenate, energize and to try and find a moment of calm. Come along as we connect and create space together for a deeper understanding of artworks on view at the museum.

This program is free and will be presented on Zoom. Closed Captioning will be available.

Join on Zoom

Postwar Japanese Calligraphy and the Challenge of Abstract Painting
May 20 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Postwar Japanese Calligraphy and the Challenge of Abstract Painting @ Online

Register on Zoom or watch on Facebook Live

As the French theoretician of abstract art Michel Seuphor wrote in 1962, “in the 1960s, every abstract painter is fascinated by the East, dreams of visiting Japan, perhaps to find the delights of Japanese calligraphy.” This talk is dedicated to the artists who launched and fueled this fascination.

In the early postwar years, avant-garde calligraphers from Japan radically transformed their art with the aim of bringing calligraphy to the same level of recognition as abstract painting. In order to reach this goal, they launched creative collaborations with European Art Informel artists and American Abstract Expressionists, and soon started sharing exhibition spaces with them at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Documenta in Kassel, São Paulo Biennale, and Carnegie International. This talk will introduce the connection between Japanese avant-garde calligraphers and abstract painters from Europe and the United States as one of the most fascinating examples of the early postwar global art exchanges, drawing attention to calligraphy as a phenomenon of the global postwar avant-garde.

This program is sponsored by the Asian Art Council.

Eugenia Bogdanova-Kummer is Lecturer (assistant professor) in Japanese Arts, Culture, and Heritage at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures, affiliated to the University of East Anglia.

She is an art historian specialising in modern Japanese art. Before joining the Sainsbury Institute in 2018, she received her Ph.D. from Heidelberg University and held postdoctoral positions at Emory University, Atlanta, GA and Smithsonian Freer and Sackler Galleries, Washington, D.C. Her research interests include postwar art in Japan; modern calligraphy history in East Asia; transcultural studies; abstract art; and the relationship between image and language in modern Japan. She is the author of Bokujinkai: Japanese Calligraphy and the Postwar Avant-Garde (Japanese Visual Culture Series 19, Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2020), and currently working on her second book project on the history of calligraphy modernization in East Asia.

May
24
Mon
The Art of Poster Design
May 24 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
The Art of Poster Design @ Online

How do you distill a feature-length film into a single compelling image? Join Akiko Stehrenberger, visual artist and prolific film poster designer for a workshop on creating film posters that invite and intrigue audiences. In this workshop, Akiko will walk participants through a case study of one of her projects, give a brief tour of her broader collection of work and also lead the class through the initial steps to develop poster design ideas for a project of their own. There will be time at the end of the class for a Q+A.

Instructor:
Akiko Stehrenberger is a 15-time CLIO award-winning movie poster illustrator and designer, who works with directors, movie studios, advertising, and movie advertising agencies.

She was deemed “Poster Girl” by Interview magazine in 2011, Creative Review dedicated their January 2011 Monograph to her illustrated movie posters, her poster for “Bad Milo” was featured on the Conan show, and Vanity Fair included her “Funny Games” and “Kiss of the Damned” posters in their “Best Movie Posters of All Time” list.

Tuition: $60

Register now
May
26
Wed
From Concept to Object: The Zine as a Creative Conduit
May 26 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
From Concept to Object: The Zine as a Creative Conduit @ Online

Self-published, limited distribution, one-of-a-kind works of text and images, zines have been a subculture mainstay for decades and continue to evolve. This workshop will recontextualize this definition as it relates to filmmaking today and examine how zines can become tools in exploring, developing, and materializing your ideas. We will look at examples of filmzines and explore how they can help you get started on a project with no equipment or funding, be a gateway to other mediums, and allow you to visualize an idea from your head to the page. Being works of art in and of themselves, we will touch on the history of the zine and the merits of physical objects in the creative process.

Join Mila Matveeva, illustrator, film producer, and zine-maker, for a workshop on how the zine can become part of your creative work and leave with resources and a few prompts to get started on your own.

Instructor:
Mila Matveeva is a film producer and illustrator in New York City. Most recent projects include the forthcoming feature film We’re All Going to the World’s Fair, as well as season 2 of The Eyeslicer. She has worked with HBO, IFP, PBS, Kickstarter, Quad Cinema, and The Future of Film is Female, and is a contributor to Screen Slate and Exclaim!. She is a former member of Silent Barn, a collectively-run arts and music show space in Brooklyn, NY.

Tuition: $80

Register now
Jun
3
Thu
Artful Meditation
Jun 3 @ 12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Join Portland Art Museum docents for a slow looking and art focused meditation experience. This interactive virtual tour invites you to relax, rejuvenate, energize and to try and find a moment of calm. Come along as we connect and create space together for a deeper understanding of artworks on view at the museum.

This program is free and will be presented on Zoom. Closed Captioning will be available.

Join on Zoom

Jun
5
Sat
Capturing an Oneiric State: Dreams and Film with Jane Schoenbrun
Jun 5 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Capturing an Oneiric State: Dreams and Film with Jane Schoenbrun @ Online

You sit in a dark room, focus in on the glowing light of the movie screen in front of you, and enter a new state of consciousness: one in which place, time, and identity are suddenly fluid, where you are free to float through a slipstream of light and sound.

Critics and filmmakers have long been aware of the intimate connection between the filmmaking medium and the dream state, but how specifically do artists use the tools of cinema to replicate such an ephemeral experience as getting lost in a dream? Join filmmaker Jane Schoenbrun (We’re All Going to the World’s FairThe Eyeslicer, collective:unconscious) for a personal tour through the history, theory, and practice of dreams on film, from the early surrealism of Maya Deren to present-day masters like David Lynch, all the way to Schoenbrun’s own work. We’ll look at case studies that illustrate the tools, rules, and cinematic ideals that have been used to immerse viewers within an oneiric state throughout cinema history, and attempt to answer the question: what does it take to effectively transport one’s dreams to the screen?

Instructor:
Jane Schoenbrun (they/she) is a non-binary filmmaker, producer, and curator currently in post-production on their narrative feature debut We’re All Going to the World’s Fair. Jane is the co-creator of The Eyeslicer, director of A Self-Induced Hallucination, a producer on Aaron Schimberg’s Chained for Life, an EP on season one of Terence Nance’s Random Acts of Flyness (HBO), the creator of the omnibus ‘dream film’ collective:unconscious (SXSW 2016), and the founder of the Radical Film Fair, which drew 2,000+ attendees in its first year. Jane has served as the Film Lead at Kickstarter and the Associate Director of Programming at IFP.

Tuition: $80

Register now
Jun
12
Sat
Working with the Composer
Jun 12 @ 10:00 am – 3:00 pm
Working with the Composer @ Online

How to find, hire and work with a film composer, from the demo process to finished picture. The instructor’s musical palette and style will guide the discussion, along with real-life case studies from a variety of feature, documentary, and fine art films. Emphasis is placed on developing strategies for successful communication between director and composer, the key to making beautiful music together.

Topics:

  • Connecting with composers Film score sources (original, licensed, public domain, live captured, sound design)
  • Typical contracts, budgets and timelines Work that occurs before a composer is hired (the temp score, music demos)
  • After a composer is hired ((the spotting session, the cue sheet, score workbooks) Giving notes and feedback (glossary of film music terms for directors) Final stages (the music mix, filing cue sheets) How to license music for film (obtaining master and sync rights)
  • Getting to know the film music team (music supervisors, music editors, copyists)
  • Filmmakers at all experience levels are welcome, as are musicians interested in film composing. Interaction with the instructor is highly encouraged.

Instructor: Mark Orton

Mark Orton, founding member of the genre-bending acoustic chamber ensemble TIN HAT, has written original scores or contributed music to numerous dramatic and documentary films including NEBRASKA, MY OLD LADY, SWEET LAND, EVERYTHING IS ILLUMINATED, BUCK, FROM THE ASHES, THE GOOD GIRL, THE BOX TROLLS, PEOPLE, PLACES, THINGS, Fernando Meirelles’ 360, Ken Burns’ ROOSEVELTS series, and Pixar’s LOOP. Recent and upcoming projects include the features CHARMING THE HEARTS OF MEN, THE LAST SHIFT, and Sony Pictures Classic’s 12 MIGHTY ORPHANS. An alumnus of the Peabody Conservatory and the Hartt School of Music, and the recipient of a Sundance Institute Composer Fellowship, he was nominated Best New Composer by the International Film Music Critics. Mark is a multi-instrumentalist and collector of antique and unusual musical instruments, which he often employs in his scores. He is a frequent contributor to both radio and podcast programming including THIS AMERICAN LIFE, ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, the HEADLONG series, and WIND OF CHANGE. As an arranger, Mark has worked with artists including Tom Waits, Willie Nelson, Mike Patton, and Madeline Peyroux. In addition, he continues to compose music for modern dance, radio drama, the circus and the concert hall. He lives in The Great Pacific Northwest with his wife and son.

Tuition: $175

Register now
Jun
14
Mon
Game Jam!
Jun 14 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Game Jam! @ Online

Monday, Wednesday, Friday | June 14, 16, 18 | 1-3 p.m.

Experience the unique process of developing a game in a collaborative class meant for High Schoolers. Participants will work as a part of a team to create characters, assets, and plans for a first-person, interactive game, using your medium of choice. Will you design the walls and furniture, animate an enemy, or plan out the level? Participants will leave with a build of the game and a perspective on indie game development.

Preproduction
Assign roles, create the ‘game book’, game goal and design including level design, and setting the scope back. The first day will be spent preparing for production. We’ll divide the work among the artists, organize our thoughts and start downloading and setting up tools and programs for the work pipeline.

Production
Asset creation starts here. Animations, User interface graphics, textures, objects, and animations. This will be the most laborious day and may spill into the next day depending on time. Audio sourcing or recording if time permits.

Postproduction
Testing, wrap-up, bug fixing, refinement, and packaging. The last day is spent culling the ideas that won’t make it, and implementing what works.

Instructor
Ian Levesque is a stop-motion animator dabbling in indie-game development. He’s been excited about sharing the rewarding process of animation with artists for as long as he was able to. He spends his time working on his personal videogame projects and playing with his rats.

Tuition: $180
Ages: 14 – 18 years

Register now
Jun
17
Thu
Artful Meditation
Jun 17 @ 12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Join Portland Art Museum docents for a slow looking and art focused meditation experience. This interactive virtual tour invites you to relax, rejuvenate, energize and to try and find a moment of calm. Come along as we connect and create space together for a deeper understanding of artworks on view at the museum.

This program is free and will be presented on Zoom. Closed Captioning will be available.

Join on Zoom

Jul
1
Thu
Artful Meditation
Jul 1 @ 12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Join Portland Art Museum docents for a slow looking and art focused meditation experience. This interactive virtual tour invites you to relax, rejuvenate, energize and to try and find a moment of calm. Come along as we connect and create space together for a deeper understanding of artworks on view at the museum.

This program is free and will be presented on Zoom. Closed Captioning will be available.

Join on Zoom

Jul
15
Thu
Artful Meditation
Jul 15 @ 12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Join Portland Art Museum docents for a slow looking and art focused meditation experience. This interactive virtual tour invites you to relax, rejuvenate, energize and to try and find a moment of calm. Come along as we connect and create space together for a deeper understanding of artworks on view at the museum.

This program is free and will be presented on Zoom. Closed Captioning will be available.

Join on Zoom

Supported in part by The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Endowments for Northwest Art, The Ford Family Foundation, Rose E. Tucker Charitable Trust, Wolf Kahn and Emily Mason Foundation, Mark and Christi Goodman / The Goodman Family, Winderlea Vineyard & Winery, Greg Kucera and Larry Yocom, Jim and Susan Winkler, and Laura Russo Gallery**Gifts made in honor of Bonnie Laing-Malcolmson,
The Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Curator of Northwest Art

Victoria Haven

Lead Pencil Studio

Dana Lynn Louis

Helen O’Toole

Akio Takamori

Willem Volkersz

Samantha Wall