Frida Kahlo, Diego on my Mind, 1943.
Frida Kahlo (Mexican, 1907-1954), Diego on my Mind, 1943, oil on masonite, courtesy of the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection. / Frida Kahlo (Mexicana, 1907-1954), Diego en mi mente, 1943, óleo sobre masonita, cortesía de la Colección de Jacques y Natasha Gelman.

Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism

from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection

Feb 19, 2022 – Jun 5, 2022

Opening February 19, 2022, Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection is a fascinating exploration of the Avant-Garde cultural movement in Mexico in the early 20th century. Featuring over 150 works, including paintings and works on paper collected by Jacques and Natasha Gelman alongside photographs and period clothing, the exhibition presents cherished works by iconic artists Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera in the broader context of Mexican Modernism, including artwork by Manuel and Lola Álvarez Bravo, Miguel Covarrubias, Gunther Gerzso, María Izquierdo, Carlos Mérida, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Juan Soriano, Rufino Tamayo and others. The Gelmans’ close relationship with this community is underscored by the number of portraits of them made by their artist friends in the exhibition. Photographs related to Kahlo, Rivera, and their enduring legacy by a global roster of artists including Lucienne Bloch, Imogen Cunningham, Juan Guzmán, Graciela Iturbide, Nickolas Muray, Edward Weston, and Guillermo Kahlo—Frida’s father—help round out our understanding of these beloved painters.

Organized by the Vergel Foundation and MondoMostre in collaboration with the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes y Literatura (INBAL). Coordinated for Portland Art Museum by Sara Krajewski, The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.


Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera y el Modernismo Mexicano

de la Colección de Jacques y Natasha Gelman

19 de febrero del 2022 – 5 de junio del 2022

Iniciando el 19 de febrero del 2022, Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera y el Modernismo Mexicano de la Colección de Jacques y Natasha Gelman es una exploración fascinante del movimiento cultural vanguardista en México a inicios del siglo XX. Reúne más de 150 obras, incluyendo pinturas y obras sobre papel coleccionadas por Jacques y Natasha Gelman, así como fotografías y vestuario de época. La exhibición presenta obras valiosas de los aclamados artistas Frida Kahlo y Diego Rivera en el contexto más amplio del modernismo mexicano, incluyendo obras de Manuel y Lola Álvarez Bravo, Miguel Covarrubias, Gunther Gerzso, María Izquierdo, Carlos Mérida, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Juan Soriano, Rufino Tamayo, entre otros. La relación cercana de los Gelman con esta comunidad se revela por la cantidad de retratos que sus amigos artistas hicieron de ellos, los cuales se encuentran en la exhibición. Una selección de fotografías relacionadas con Kahlo, Rivera y su legado perpetuo de un listado global de artistas, incluyendo a Lucienne Bloch, Imogen Cunningham, Juan Guzmán, Graciela Iturbide, Nickolas Muray, Edward Weston, y Guillermo Kahlo (padre de Frida), ayudarán a esbozar nuestra percepción sobre estos estimados pintores.

Organizado por el Vergel Foundation y MondoMostre en colaboración con el Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes y Literatura (INBAL). Coordinado para el Portland Art Museum por Sara Krajewski y el Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.

Feb
27
Sun
Women Artists and the Construction of Mexicanidad
Feb 27 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Women Artists and the Construction of Mexicanidad

Registration is closed on Zoom. Please watch on our Facebook page.

With Alberto Mckelligan Hernández, Ph.D., Assistant Professor Of Art History At Portland State University

Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism provides an exciting opportunity for Portland audiences to explore the ways in which women artists contributed to the immense cultural transformations of early-20th-century Mexico. After the violent battles of the Mexican Revolution (1910–1920), the country was eager to define a new form of national identity, a complex process later described as the construction of mexicanidad, or Mexicanness. Join Alberto McKelligan Hernández in this virtual opening lecture for a look into the groundbreaking contributions of women artists that reveal how women navigated the social and artistic context of post-revolutionary Mexico and the complexities and contradictions associated with the construction of mexicanidad.

Alberto McKelligan Hernández completed his Ph.D. from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). His research received the Carolyn G. Heilbrun Dissertation Prize from CUNY’s Center for the Study of Women and Society. He also curated Mónica Mayer: Translocal Translations, 1978-2018 for Paragon Gallery in Portland, and his research on feminist art in Mexico has been published in Nierika: Revista de Estudios de Arte and the Journal of International Women’s Studies.

Mar
2
Wed
Educator Program: Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism
Mar 2 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Educator Program: Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism @ Online

Register on Zoom

Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection is a fascinating exploration of the Avant-Garde cultural movement in Mexico in the early twentieth century. Featuring over 150 works, including paintings, prints, and photography, the exhibition presents works by iconic artists Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera in the broader context of Mexican Modernism. It shows the role that artists and intellectuals played in the emergence of national identity and creative spirit following the end of the Mexican Revolution in 1920. Join us for an introduction to the major artworks and themes from the exhibition, followed by interactive workshops facilitated by members of the Teacher Advisory Council.

5:30 – 6:30 p.m. – Lecture and Q&A with Sara Krajewski, The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art

6:30 – 7:00 p.m. – Breakout Group Workshops 

  • Mexicanidad and the Uplifting of Indigenous Culture:  Exploring Symbolism and Values
    Marcelle Valladares, Catlin Gabel
    We will center art from the exhibition and explore the concept of Mexicanidad while also discussing the present day cultural, economic and political Land Back movement. The first half hour will be devoted to exploring the concepts. The second half hour will be optional and time for discussion and possible planning for how to incorporate the art and ideas into your classroom lessons.
  • Subverting the Imperial Gaze: Frida Kahlo and the Politics of Transcultural Memory, Embodiment, and Performance in Latin America
    Ximena Keogh Serrano, Pacific University
    We will read the artistic production and global legacy of Frida Kahlo through the lens of Latin American intellectual history. This includes theories of transculturation (A. Rama), hybridization (N. Garía Canclini), and performance (D. Taylor).
  • Revolutionary Art
    Joanne Kim and Lisa Notman, Northwest Academy
    This workshop will provide educators with an introduction to the historical context of the pieces in this exhibition as products of the Mexican Revolution and as a way of establishing a new Mexican Identity post-revolution through the rich symbolism of Frida Kahlo’s art and iconography. We will discuss how these works can be used to teach students about historical and contemporary revolutions and revolutionary art. (Target student audience: HS foreign language & HS English and Humanities).
  • Affinity Group – Culturally Specific: Exploring Latinx Identity Through Art
    Dora Lisa Chavez, Metropolitan Family Services
    We will center our conversations around exploring Latinx identity through artworks featured in the exhibition. We will also hold space for processing, self reflection, while creating time and space for connections with peers.

Join us for this online program and receive a complimentary ticket to the Museum!

Mar
6
Sun
Frida, Fibromyalgia, and Feminism
Mar 6 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Frida, Fibromyalgia, and Feminism

Register on Zoom and watch on Facebook Live

With Dr. Ginevra Liptan and Vanessa Severo

Presented in conjunction with Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection, this free virtual program brings Dr. Ginevra Liptan and Vanessa Severo into conversation around the impact Frida Kahlo’s disabilities had on her art, how her art impacted her experience as a Disabled individual, and how she changed cultural norms around disability and chronic illness.

Ginevra Liptan, MD is a graduate of Tufts University School of Medicine. After developing fibromyalgia in medical school, she became fascinated with Frida Kahlo after reading in a medical journal that Frida likely suffered from the same illness. After completing a residency in internal medicine Dr. Liptan founded The Frida Center for Fibromyalgia, where she specializes in treating this painful and complex illness.

Vanessa Severo is the recipient of the TCG 11th Round of the Fox Foundation resident Actor  Fellowships, 2017. She is the playwright and actor of ‘Frida…A Self Portrait’ (2020 Kilroys’ List)  a one woman production about the tumultuous and brilliant life of Frida Kahlo. Vanessa is  passionate about utilizing the element of Suzuki method in her work to challenge the  boundaries of storytelling, and explore the depths of movement, composition, and the power  of stillness.

Mar
18
Fri
Multiple Journeys: The Life and Work of Gómez-Peña
Mar 18 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Multiple Journeys: The Life and Work of Gómez-Peña @ Kridel Grand Ballroom

PLEASE NOTE: COVID-19 vaccine cards and/or a negative COVID test result are required for admissions into this program.  COVID tests can be either PCR or rapid antigen and must be taken within a 72 hour window prior to the start of the performance.  Masks are highly encouraged. 

A ritual performative lecture involving an epic performance poem/chronology and utilizes literature as a means to recapture memory. 

Multiple Journeys: the life and work of Gómez-Peña is a performance lecture that invokes text and historical photographs to chronicle the performance art practice of post-Mexican writer, artist and activist Guillermo Gómez-Peña. By tracing his family life as well as his past 35 years in performance, visual and literary forms, the artist discusses his work in context to the larger evolution of the field as well as to the main political and social events of the times. 

For the past 15 years, with the archival assistance of Emma Tramposch and other colleagues, Gómez-Peña artist has been going through the process of cataloging his extensive personal collection of original photographs, slides, videos, audio-art, books and ephemera documenting his interdisciplinary arts practice. In the process they have come across unique historical materials that lend perfectly to this form of artistic and educational presentation. In keeping with the hybrid spirit of his work, he has translated his archives into this one-hour performative audio-visual lecture. 

Guillermo Gómez-Peña is a performance artist, writer, activist, radical pedagogue and artistic director of the performance troupe La Pocha Nostra. Born in Mexico City, he moved to the US in 1978, and since 1995, his two homes have been San Francisco and Mexico City. His performance work and 21 books have contributed to the debates on cultural, generational, and gender diversity, border culture and North-South relations.

His art work has been presented at over one thousand venues across the US, Canada, Latin America, Europe, Russia, South Africa and Australia. A MacArthur Fellow, USA Artists Fellow, and a Bessie, Guggenheim, and American Book Award winner, he is a regular contributor to newspapers and magazines in the US, Mexico, and Europe and a contributing editor to The Drama Review (NYU-MIT), the Performance Art Week Journal of the Venice Biennale, and emisférica, the publication of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics (NYU). Gómez-Peña is currently a Patron for the London-based Live Art Development Agency, and a Senior Fellow in the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics.

Book tickets

Presented in conjunction with Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection.

Mar
31
Thu
Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism in the USA and Their Worldwide Contributions
Mar 31 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism in the USA and Their Worldwide Contributions

Register on Zoom and watch on Facebook Live

“Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism in the USA and Their Worldwide Contributions” is a look at the widespread legacy of Mexico’s avant-garde artists, presented in conjunction with Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection. Join Portland-based artist and educator, Hector H Hernandez, in a lecture that reflects upon this movement’s influence within the United States, along with the artistic contributions of Kahlo and Rivera within US art circles.  Drawing upon his own art practice, mural painting, and Chicanx identity, Hernandez considers the ways in which Mexican Modernist artists departed from European models of creative expression to forge a unique voice that responds to such European hegemony and echoes through the work of today’s artists.

Mr. Hernandez’ first experience painting murals was achieved in Mexico City while studying a program in Social Anthropology. In that opportunity Mr. Hernandez participated as collaborator for two murals under the guidance of the Mexican master painter Arnold Belkin. This experience allowed him to follow a path to community murals from the teachings of the Mexican school of painting. Since then, his academic training gained in painting murals has focused on community murals with an academic background, so Mr. Hernandez may reach new generations of painters and community artists.

Following his academic formation Mr. Hernandez received the MFA from the University of Oregon in 1999 in painting and a MIS in Art and Education, with a Bachelor in FA in addition to an undergraduate degree in Social Anthropology. He has had his work published in books in Europe.

In addition to work on mural art Mr. Hernandez has taught art history and culture of Mexico. Currently Mr. Hernandez has been teaching mural painting at Portland State University and Chemeketa Community College for the last 12 years, and also has developed an exchange program with National School of Sculpture, Engraving and Painting “La Esmeralda” in Mexico City, painting murals with students from both Universities.
Apr
3
Sun
The Houses of Frida and Diego
Apr 3 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
The Houses of Frida and Diego @ Online

Register on Zoom or join on Facebook Live

The famous houses that Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera inhabited in the outskirts of Mexico City, the Casa Azul in Coyoacán -Frida’s birthplace and favorite place of residence- and the “studio-houses” in San Ángel -designed by radical architect Juan O’Gorman- are inseparable from their lives, work, and personalities. Little is known however of the couple’s third house. Long thought to be an “apartment,” this was in fact their urban residence, where Frida moved into after her heartbreaking split from Diego in 1934. This lecture will offer a historical and visual tour of Frida and Diego’s three houses in Mexico City: where they lived, loved, and betrayed each other, where they conceived and created their art work, where they gathered their amazing collection of artifacts while coexisting with exotic plants and animals, and where they met the friends and acquaintances that -together with them- formed one of the most important circles of artists and intellectuals of post-revolutionary Mexico. This lecture will present for the first time to the U.S. audience Frida and Diego’s “other” house in Mexico City, which was recently discovered by the author and presenter, Juan Manuel Heredia.

Juan Manuel Heredia is Associate Professor of Architecture at Portland State University and holds a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in architecture from the University of Pennsylvania. He teaches architectural design, history, and theory, focusing on 20th century Mexico. He is the author of The First Modern Building in Mexico (2020), co-editor (with Nicholas Temple and Andrzej Piotrowski) of The Routledge Handbook of the Reception of Classical Architecture (2019), and co-author (with Miquel Adrià) of Juan Sordo Madaleno 1916-1985 (2013). Recently, he published the article “The Other House for Diego and Frida and the Mystery of Eileen Gray in Mexico,” which unearths a hitherto unknown house for these Mexican artists.

Presented in conjunction with Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection.

Apr
10
Sun
Murals and Collective Process: A Panel Discussion
Apr 10 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Murals and Collective Process: A Panel Discussion

Register on Zoom and watch on Facebook Live

Join artists Hector Hernandez, Angennette Escobar, Victor Hugo Garza and Christian Barrios in a panel discussion that dives deep into their work, concept and process around their mural installation for Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection. Actively painting in the Schnitzer Courtyard for the first portion of the exhibition, these artists take a moment to reflect with panel moderator Kristin Solomon on their collaboration and the convergence of their practices in this work.

Kristin Solomon is a Creative Business Strategist with over 20 years experience in arts administration. She holds a Bachelors of Fine Arts in Photography from the School of Visual Arts and a Masters in Arts and Cultural Management from Pratt Institute, in New York City. Kristin manages multiple roles in the Portland arts community. She is the part-time Director of Blackfish Gallery, an artist-owned cooperative in the heart of the Pearl Arts District. She is also the Founder and Lead Principal of Arts and Cultural Management, an agency that advises artists and non-profit organizations on strategic planning and development. She offers her guidance through one-on-one coaching sessions, workshops, retreats, and online courses through her new platform THINK WITH YOUR HEART INSTITUTE ONLINE. In addition, she serves on the Boards of the Portland Art Dealers Association, Portland Open Studios, Creative Arts Community, and the Friends of Menucha Foundation.

Hector Hernandez’ first experience painting murals was achieved in Mexico City while studying a program in Social Anthropology. In that opportunity Mr. Hernandez participated as collaborator for two murals under the guidance of the Mexican master painter Arnold Belkin. This experience allowed him to follow a path to community murals from the teachings of the Mexican school of painting. Following his academic formation Mr. Hernandez received the MFA from the University of Oregon in 1999 in painting and a MIS in Art and Education, with a Bachelor in FA in addition to an undergraduate degree in Social Anthropology. Currently Mr. Hernandez has been teaching mural painting at Portland State University and Chemeketa Community College for the last 12 years, and also has developed an exchange program with National School of Sculpture, Engraving and Painting “La Esmeralda” in Mexico City, painting murals with students from both Universities.

Angennette Escobar is a working artist and teacher living in Portland, Oregon. Escobar has a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Sculpture and a minor in Art History. She also attended the MFA program at the University of California, San Diego with a focus on Sculpture and Performance Art. She currently exhibits at Blackfish Gallery in Portland, Oregon and Trails End Gallery in eastern Washington.  Escobar holds a Masters of Arts in Teaching from George Fox University and teaches Sculpture and 3D Design at Wilsonville High School in Wilsonville, Oregon.  Escobar is a Mexican-American artist that was raised along the Mexican border in South Texas in the Rio Grande Valley. Her most recent work often involves Mexican religious iconography, specifically Milagros, small metal charms that represent miracles. She uses body imagery intertwined with religious objects to explore her cultural identity and heritage as well as her corporeal reality as a human being. 

Christian J. Barrios was born in Mexico City where he grew up in a traditional household. When he was very young, he learned the art of ceramic painting and Talabera in his family business. At the age of 16, he moved to the United States. Years later, he met Gene Zanni who was a marquetry artist; Christian apprenticed for him for 7 years, learning a lot about marquetry, such as how beautiful types of wood can create wonderful pictures. Also during this time, Christian learned other visual arts, like acrylics and paper maché. Christian has painted murals that represent cultural diversity and community. Some of these murals have been created in collaboration with youth at different school locations. Currently, Christian is investing his time in helping underserved communities by teaching art in different schools of Portland, OR through Latino Network -Studio Latino, ETHOS, and RightBrain Initiative. He is an active member of IdeAl-PDX and a member of the Equity Committee of Grace Art Camp and Young Audiences Associated Board. 

Victor Hugo Garza is originally from Monterrey, Mexico but has lived most of his adult life in the United States. He has been interested in the arts since he was very young. Pursuing his artistic interest, he moved to Hollywood, California to attend filmschool, where he graduated with a specialty in sound and post-production. After working in the Hollywood industry as a sound designer for 10 years, he relocated to Oaxaca, Mexico, where he studied painting and worked with different mediums: oil, acrylic, watercolor, ink, mixed media and wood. His work was shown in galleries around the city. He created murals with a community of artists. As a composer and guitarist, he produced two records of his original music in L.A. Victor has also lived in Poitier, France for a year, where he took art classes and taught English. In Iowa City, he taught theatre, dance and history for high school. In 2005, he moved to Portland, Oregon to study art and alternative education and began teaching at the Portland Waldorf School the same year, where he still teaches today. His artwork has been shown at several galleries around Portland, and his visionary work has traveled across the world via social media. Today as a digital artist, graphic designer and a videographer, Victor Hugo is interested in bridging new technologies with art. His mission is to innovate, inspire, and instill hope, bringing a positive message with his vision.

Presented in conjunction with Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection.

Apr
24
Sun
Miller Family Free Day
Apr 24 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

Join us for the Miller Family Free Day, featuring the HeART of Portland: PPS K-12 Student Arts Showcase, Mariachi Tradición of Forest Grove High School, and Corazones Alegres, the Latino Network’s Ballet Folklórico!

Free, advance, timed-entry tickets for Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism are available online. Limited walk-in tickets will also be available all day on April 24, but are not guaranteed.

Performances and Activities include:

  • 10 a.m.–5 p.m. The HeART of Portland: PPS K-12 Student Art Exhibition and lotería game and art activity tables in the Miller Gallery, Mark Building
  • 11 a.m.–4 p.m.: The HeART of Portland PPS student performances in the galleries, including choirs, dancers, and musicians from Harriet Tubman, da Vinci, and Sellwood Middle Schools and Cleveland, Jefferson, Grant, and Franklin High Schools. Detailed performance schedule here.
  • 2–3:30 p.m. Mariachi Tradición of Forest Grove High School and Corazones Alegres, the Latino Network’s Ballet Folklórico performing in the Fields Sunken Ballroom, Mark Building

Plus…

DJ sets by The Numberz.fm in the AUX/MUTE galleries on the fourth floor of the main museum

Reserve free tickets

Live mural painting in the central Museum courtyard by artists from IDEAL PDX

Come visit other days as well—Youth 17 and under always have free admission to the Museum!

Event flyer PDF in English and Español.

Miller Family Free Days are generously supported by Sharon L. Miller and Family. Museum access programs are generously supported by the Gordon D. Sondland and Katherine J. Durant Foundation, Bank of America, the William H. and Mary L. Bauman Foundation, the Lamb Baldwin Foundation, the Joseph E. Weston Public Foundation of the Oregon Community Foundation, the Pamplin Foundation Endowment for the Arts, Members of the Portland Art Museum, and the Citizens of Portland through the Arts and Education Access Fund.


Día Gratuito patrocinado por la Familia Miller
Cuándo: 24 de abril, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Dónde: Galerías del Museo, el Salón Fields Sunken y la Galería Miller en el Edificio Mark

¡Acompáñanos al Día Gratuito patrocinado por la Familia Miller en el Museo de Arte de Portland! Presentando el Corazón de Portland:
Exhibición de arte de estudiantes de las Escuelas Públicas de Portland (K-12), el Mariachi Tradición, de la Forest Grove High School y
Corazones Alegres, el Ballet Folklórico de Latino Network.

Boletos gratuitos con horarios previamente asignados para Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, y el Modernismo Mexicano estarán disponibles en el sitio web del Museo a partir del miércoles 20 de abril aquí. El 24 de abril habrá algunos boletos disponibles, pero no están asegurados.

Las actividades y espectáculos incluyen:

  • 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. El Corazón de Portland: Exhibición de arte de estudiantes del las Escuelas Públicas de Portland (K-12), juego de lotería y mesas de actividades de arte en la Galería Miller del Edificio Mark
  • 11:00 a.m. en adelante: cada hora se presentarán los estudiantes de las Escuelas Públicas de Portland, El Corazón de Portland, en las galerías, con espectáculos de coros, bailarines y músicos de las escuelas secundarias Harriet Tubman, da Vinci y Sellwood, y las preparatorias Cleveland, Jefferson, Grant y Franklin. Programa de rendimiento.
  • 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. Mariachi Tradición, de la Forest Grove High School y Corazones Alegres, el Ballet Folklórico de Latino Network,
    presentándose en el Edificio Mark Building del Salón Fields Sunken Además…
  • Sesiones musicales por DJs de The Numberz.fm en las galerías AUX/MUTE del cuarto piso del museo principal
  • Pintura mural en vivo en el patio central del Museo por artistas de IDEAL PDX

También visítanos otros días — ¡Jóvenes de 17 años y menores siempre tienen admisión gratuita al Museo!

Volante del evento en Inglés y en Español

Los días gratuitos son generosamente financiados por Sharon L. Miller y familia. Los programas de acceso al Museo son generosamente financiados por la Fundación Gordon D. Sondland y Katherine J. Durant, Bank of America, la Fundación William H. y Mary L. Bauman, la Fundación Lamb Baldwin, la Fundación Pública Joseph E. Weston de la Oregon Community Foundation, el Fondo para las Artes de la Fundación Pamplin, miembros del Museo de Arte de Portland y ciudadanos de Portland a través del Fondo de Acceso a las Artes y la Educación.

May
12
Thu
WILD WOMAN Artist Talk
May 12 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
WILD WOMAN Artist Talk

Join WILD WOMAN designer Myriam Marcela De Anda and textile artist Laura Renée Maier in a discussion of their collaborative process creating wearable art with a social purpose.

WILD WOMAN is a couture clothing collection that marries art and fashion to build unity across borders while celebrating diversity and multicultural expression.  The project was inspired by the January 2017 Women’s March – a global protest that centered women’s rights as human rights at the start of Donald Trump’s US presidency.  Over the last five years, the WILD WOMAN collection has grown and pieces of the collection have been shown around the world.  The twelve pieces in the WILD WOMAN collection will ultimately be auctioned off, with one hundred percent of the proceeds going to support Fondo Semillas, a non-profit feminist organization focused on improving women’s and trans people lives in Mexico.    

In partnership with the Portland Art Museum and the current exhibition, Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and Mexican Modernism, the creators of WILD WOMAN collaborated on Magdalena, a cape inspired by Kahlo’s lithograph, Frida and the Miscarriage (1932), a work that is currently on view in the exhibition.

Register on Zoom or watch on Facebook

Myriam Marcela De Anda was born in Monterrey, Nuevo Leon and has been living in Portland, OR for the last twenty years. Since studying fashion design in Guadalajara, Mexico, Marcela has evolved into a designer with a mission to bring more sustainability and purpose to her work in the fashion industry. It is with this intention that she began her own label, Myriam Marcela. Her work is primarily done by hand, giving texture and dimension to her designs. As a couturier with an acute sense of detail and an appreciation for bold colors and blended patterns, Marcela finds her passion through creating one-of-a-kind custom pieces for all women that are intended to last a lifetime. 

Laura Renée Maier is a figurative artist with a focus on textiles and technological mediums. In her works, texture is deeply connected to human memory and the metaphysical body. In her textile pieces, Laura Renée utilizes an antique hand-crank sewing machine to meticulously stitch figures in a months-long meditative practice. Laura Renée explores the convergence of tech and traditional manual practices as a vehicle to further investigate the concepts of the human figure and the physical embodiment of memory in a medium that reflects our continuous human evolution. Laura Renée is originally from Seattle, Washington and currently lives and works between New York and Bogotá, Colombia.

Presented in conjunction with Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection.

May
29
Sun
Frida is Here: Mural Painting Reflections by IDEAL PDX
May 29 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Frida is Here: Mural Painting Reflections by IDEAL PDX @ Online

Register on Zoom or join on Facebook Live

Join IDEAL PDX artists Jessica Lagunas,  William Hernandez, Romina del Castillo, José Solis and Daniel Santollo in a panel discussion that talks about the process and the reflections that inspired the artists to create their mural for Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and Mexican ModernismEstablished in 2010, IDEAL PDX is a  collaborative group of Latino artists that accomplish new projects displaying individual Visual and Performing Artists in the Northwest. In creating their mural in the Museum’s Schnitzer Courtyard, the artists envision Frida Kahlo and Diego coming from the Mictlan – the Mexican-infra world, to visit the beautiful Pacific Northwest. Arriving to the Multnomah, Cathlamet, Clackamas, Chinook, Tualatin Kalapuya, Molalla, and other tribe territories, they bring with them their beloved México. Like in a dream, Frida and Diego open and enlighten their way to the PNW to explore other forms of life and see themselves within the people’s lives.  This panel discussion highlights the artists’ special attention to collecting and studying details of Frida and Diego’s life together and their process of reflecting these details in their mural work.  

IDEAL PDX‘s mission is to expand and include artists from Latinoamerica around the State of Oregon to provide professional development to strengthen the artists’ integration into the local economy. The origin of IDEAL PDX began in July 2010, when Milagro invited leaders representing a variety of disciplines to meet and share their advice, networks, and leadership, planting the seed for a collaborative creative group. Over the years, IDEAL PDX has received commissions and support from different organizations. One of the principal sponsors is The Center for the Arts P’5, who has supported over 50 local artists from Latinoamerica by exhibiting their work in this space. Each year artists have the opportunity to sell and present their work from different disciplines at IDEAL’s annual festival and market, EL TRUEQUE. IDEAL PDX is committed to elevating the community values by humanizing and invigorating shared spaces through the transformative power of public art.

Jessica Lagunas, Co-Founder and  Creative Artistic  Director of IDEAL PDX.  Lagunas is a Mexican-born Certified e.i- Artistic Life Coach, a multidisciplinary artist, a teaching artist, and an Arts and Culture Program Manager. Lagunas has worked tirelessly to strengthen the growing network of artists of all disciplines, finding unique opportunities to socialize, receive professional and artistic training, and showcase their work in different parts of the city. As committed as she is to exploring and strengthening her skills in other disciplines, she is passionate about fortifying the Latino Artistic Community of Oregon. 

William Hernandez, IDEAL PDX Curator and Lead Project Art Director, is a Portland-based painter whose artwork creates a bridge spanning his traditions and memories to his life today as an artist, family man, and Peruvian living in the Pacific Northwest. Trained as a painter at Lima’s Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes (1995-2002), Hernandez worked as a fine artist and graphic designer for public and international institutions in Lima before settling in Portland in 2009. His surreal, graphic, and illustrative style creates layered narratives infused with lingering emotions from whimsy to melancholy. Hernandez is an active artist, teacher, and organizer in the Pacific Northwest. 

Romina del Castillo was born in Lima, Peru, raised in Santiago de Chile, and has been an immigrant in the United States since the age of 16. She obtained her Bachelors of Fine Arts with an emphasis on Drawing and Painting at California State University Long Beach. She relocated to Portland, Oregon in 2018. Her artistic practice remains close to her roots with South American fauna and landscape as recurring themes. She works in various media, including drawing, painting, and straw marquetry. She’s a new member of IDEAL PDX, currently collaborating in their mural series around town.

Jose Solis is a Portland mural artist & designer/art director for film & television, with over 30 years of experience.  Jose’s work has been recognized for his unique style with awards including: Silver Medal Award at the International Film & Television Festival of New York, Best Spiritual Documentary Judge’s Award winner, People’s Choice Award Winner, & more. Jose was born in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. An Oregonian since1969, he founded Creative Art Services in Portland, OR in 1983, offering services in set design & scene shop, as well as the production of murals, signs & custom prop fabrication.

Daniel Santollo is a Portland- based, indigenous/Chicano, self-taught visual artist. He was born in Michoacan, Mexico, and raised in Portland. He is a creative person by nature. Daniel loves to bring ideas to life, and is very passionate about what he does. The vibrant colors, detailed patterns, and rich history of his indigenous Mexican culture play a big role in his life and work. Daniel’s artwork ranges from digital illustrations, printmaking, logos, traditional paintings to murals.

Presented in conjunction with Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection.

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The Portland Art Museum collaborated with Professor Ximena Keogh Serrano and her students at Pacific University to create videos introducing some of the central concepts and works in the exhibition. Videos are captioned in both Spanish and English. Click the gear icon for settings to change caption language.

 

 

 

 

During the run of Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and Mexican Modernism, the Museum is excited to partner with two collective groups of artists for live mural painting in the Schnitzer Courtyard. The first collaboration includes artists Hector Hernandez, Angennette Escobar, Christian Barrios and Victor Hugo Garza working from March 2nd through April 2nd in both a tryptic mural and video projection art. The second collaboration consists of IDEAL PDX artists Jessica Lagunas, William Hernandez, Romina del Castillo, José Solis and Daniel Santollo, who will work together on a large-scale mural from April 8th through May 29th. Working during public hours, these artists encourage and welcome audience questions and conversation.

To learn more about these projects and the artists behind them, check out forthcoming posts on the Museum’s Blog, as well as upcoming programs such as Murals and Collective Process: A Panel Discussion on April 10th and Shared Work: Mural Painting with IDEAL PDX on May 29th.

From May 4th through June 5th, the Museum is partnering with designer Myriam Marcela and textile artist Laura Renée Maier in a pop-up exhibition of their luxury clothing collection, WILD WOMAN.  Inspired by the January 2017 Women’s March, the WILD WOMAN collection highlights unity across borders, women’s empowerment, and the act of giving back.  In response to works on view in Mexican Modernism, Marcela and Maier will present their latest piece in the collection, Magdalena, a cape that takes inspiration from Kahlo’s lithograph, Frida and the Miscarriage (1932). The future goal for the collection is to auction each piece in the WILD WOMAN series, donating 100% of the proceeds to Fondo Semillas, a non-profit organization that works to improve women’s lives in Mexico.  To learn more about WILD WOMAN, join the creators for a virtual artist talk on Thursday, May 12th at 5:30 PM. 

Myriam Marcela De Anda was born in Monterrey, Nuevo Leon and has been living in Portland, OR for the last twenty years. Since studying fashion design in Guadalajara, Mexico, Marcela has evolved into a designer with a mission to bring more sustainability and purpose to her work in the fashion industry. It is with this intention that she began her own label, Myriam Marcela. Her work is primarily done by hand, giving texture and dimension to her designs. As a couturier with an acute sense of detail and an appreciation for bold colors and blended patterns, Marcela finds her passion through creating one-of-a-kind custom pieces for all women that are intended to last a lifetime. 

Laura Renée Maier is a figurative artist with a focus on textiles and technological mediums. In her works, texture is deeply connected to human memory and the metaphysical body. In her textile pieces, Laura Renée utilizes an antique hand-crank sewing machine to meticulously stitch figures in a months-long meditative practice. Laura Renée explores the convergence of tech and traditional manual practices as a vehicle to further investigate the concepts of the human figure and the physical embodiment of memory in a medium that reflects our continuous human evolution. Laura Renée is originally from Seattle, Washington and currently lives and works between New York and Bogotá, Colombia. 

Creation of the WILD WOMAN Magdalena Cape is supported by the Portland Art Museum, the Meriwether Group, Otiima and Scarlet Chamberlin Styling Co. 

Presenting Sponsors

  • The Laura and Roger Meier Family
  • Jordan & Arlene Schnitzer Care Foundation

Lead Corporate Sponsor

Major Sponsors

  • Mary Beth and Roger Burpee
  • Cooper and Sanda DuBois
  • Mr. and Mrs. William Whitsell
  • The Standard
  • National Endowment for the Arts

Sponsors

  • Boeing
  • Ed Cauduro Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation
  • Ferguson Wellman Capital Management
  • Drs. Dolores and Fernando Leon
  • Oregon Arts Commission
  • Greg and Cathy Tibbles
  • Dan Wieden and Priscilla Bernard Wieden

Supporters

  • Stephanie Fowler and Irving Levin of The Renaissance Foundation
  • Mark and Katherine Frandsen
  • Judy and Hank Hummelt
  • Lina Garcia Seabold and Steve Seabold
  • Rose E. Tucker Charitable Trust
  • Robert Trotman Interior Design
  • Wells Fargo Foundation

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