Fallen Fruit (David Burns and Austin Young), 2015
Fallen Fruit (David Burns and Austin Young), 2015. This custom designed wallpaper echoes the 19th century and the era of the founding of art museums in the United States.

Paradise installation photo

Fallen Fruit of Portland

Paradise is part of Fallen Fruit of Portland, a suite of five site-specific projects taking place throughout Portland in October and November 2015. Other Fallen Fruit of Portland projects include Urban Fruit Trails, The Geography of We (a youth curated exhibition at Caldera), Division of Identification, and the commissioning of eight Oregon-based artist projects. All projects are presented by Caldera and funded by a Creative Heights grant from The Oregon Community Foundation. For more information on the Fallen Fruit of Portland projects or Caldera, please visit http://calderaarts.org/caldera/.

Paradise

Fallen Fruit
(David Burns and Austin Young)

Oct 24, 2015 – Jan 17, 2016

Download The Paradise Art Finder

 
“…I was upon the summit of a tall mountain which commands a bewildering prospect of that loved valley… The birds of autumn caroled their soft melodies around, and the blushing flowret bent at the feet of the intruder… Away to the north was the smoke wreathing above the trees which clustered around the lone mission-house and I thought there was an altar to God, and incense from the bosom of the wilderness.”
—Excerpt from A Sketch of the Oregon Territory, or Emigrant’s Guide, Philip L. Edwards, 1842.

By the 1850s, the rutted Oregon Trail ferried large numbers of settlers into the heart of the Willamette Valley. A steady diet of florid guidebooks promised a fecund new Eden where everything grew. Oregon came packaged as a vision of “paradise,” ripe with possibility and a symbol of Westward Expansion and Manifest Destiny.

The artist collaborative Fallen Fruit will explore Oregon’s paradisiacal backyard through the lens of Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Based in Los Angeles, artists David Allen Burns and Austin Young create site-specific projects using fruit to examine concepts of place, history, and issues of representation often addressing questions of public space.

The apple is a fruit that has come to represent the hearty bounty of the Northwest with deep connections to the landscape and of westward movement. It’s often a symbol of moral questioning and serves as a metaphoric reference to the Garden of Eden. In Paradise, Fallen Fruit will create an eye-popping immersive art installation in the Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Sculpture Court using the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collections to thematically explore concepts of “paradise,” sublime landscape, and the greater Northwest.

Fallen Fruit is an art collaboration originally conceived in 2004 by David Allen Burns, Matias Viegener and Austin Young. Since 2013, Burns and Young have continued the collaborative work. Fallen Fruit began by mapping fruit trees growing on or over public property in Los Angeles. The collaboration has expanded to include serialized public projects and site-specific installations which invite the public to experience the world as a fruitful place. The artists have realized projects at a range of institutions including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), Hammer Museum-UCLA, Atlanta Center for Contemporary Art, and Prospect 3 New Orleans.

Sponsors

Supported in part by Miller Meigs Endowment for Contemporary Art, The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, Jo Whitsell, ARC Document Solutions, and the Exhibition Series Sponsors.

Related Events

Oct
24
Sat
OPENS: Paradise: Fallen Fruit
Oct 24 all-day

Paradise: Fallen Fruit

October 24, 2015 – January 17, 2016

Paradise is part of Fallen Fruit of Portland, a suite of five site-specific projects taking place throughout Portland in October and November 2015. Other Fallen Fruit of Portland projects include Urban Fruit TrailsThe Geography of We (a youth curated exhibition at Caldera), Division of Identification, and the commissioning of eight Oregon-based artist projects. All projects are presented by Caldera and funded by a Creative Heights grant from The Oregon Community Foundation. For more information on the Fallen Fruit of Portland projects or Caldera, please visit http://calderaarts.org/caldera/.

 

Miller Family Free Day
Oct 24 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

Join the Museum and Caldera for “A Day in Paradise,” celebrating Fallen Fruit of Portland and the opening of the exhibition Paradise.

Family programs are generously supported in part by Sharon L. Miller and Family, the Gordon D. Sondland and Katherine J. Durant Foundation, and the Lamb Baldwin Foundation.

A Day in Paradise
Oct 24 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Fallen Fruit (David Burns and Austin Young), 2015
Fallen Fruit (David Burns and Austin Young), 2015. This custom designed wallpaper echoes the 19th century and the era of the founding of art museums in the United States.

Over the past year, artists David Allen Burns and Austin Young have built relationships across communities in Portland to create and collaborate on a range of works that speak to the history of the region, using the iconic Northwest apple as their lens. Join us for a day- long exploration of this ambitious project, Fallen Fruit of Portland, which includes the opening of their large-scale exhibition Paradise as well as various artist commissions and other fruitful experiences.

A Day in Paradise confirmed artists include Natalie Ball, William Cravis, Bruce Conkle, Tahni Holt, Horatio Law, Jess Perlitz, DeAngelo Raines,and Caldera Youth.

Download the A Day in Paradise brochure and map

All activities will be free as part of Miller Family Free Day.


ACTIVITIES IN AND NEAR THE MUSEUM

FRUIT MAGAZINE
Noon – 4pm
In one day the public, along with David Burns and Austin Young, will use fruit and its metaphors to create a limited edition contemporary culture magazine. Fruit Magazine‘s Portland­ specific content will feature native languages and visual vocabularies that reflect Portland’s diversity. “Fruit Magazine” will be published as a downloadable PDF accessible at w​ww.CalderaArts.org/FallenFruitPDX​ and w​ww.fallenfruit.org/fallenfruitmagazine​.

APPLES & POMEGRANATES, TAHNI HOLT
1 & 3pm
Building on the mythological idea of Eve eating the apple in the Garden of Eden, this is a solo dance performance that walks the fault line between rejected female stereotypes and embodied expression, wrestling with first impressions, assumptions and associations, motherhood, sensationalism, emotionality, sexuality, an image/time­bound body, and the body in the present moment.  Sound Score and technical support by Luke Wyland.

WARHOOP FLASHMOB, NATALIE BALL
2pm
Natalie will facilitate War Hooping as used in battle by Native Americans across the country. Also known as a battle cry, Li-Li is a vocal projection used for intimidation, celebration, and energy charge. Women use Lii-Lii which is a tongue/vocal projection that is LOUD! They still do them today. Natalie will bring people from her tribe to do Lii-Lii, but everyone in the attendance will be invited to participate with them.

A MONUMENT FOR BICYCLISTS, BILL CRAVIS
Noon – 4pm
South Parks Block by the equestrian statue of  Theodore Roosevelt across from Portland Art Museum
Portland bicyclists become temporary “living statues” in the South Parks neighborhood, alongside the equestrian statue of Theodore Roosevelt. A small replica of the concrete plinth supporting the Roosevelt statue will be placed near to the original. Bicyclists will be invited to become temporary “living statues” atop the miniature plinth, which will be photographed. These urban bicyclists will be displayed as today’s heroes – contemporary mavericks who play an active role in reducing the threat of global climate change. Photos will be placed online so that participants can download them.

THE RIGHT HAND OF FELLOWSHIP, DeANGELO RAINS
Noon – 4pm
South Parks Blocks at the Lincoln Statue
With the belief that barriers to identification can be overcome, DeAngelo Raines proposes a performative social engagement installation to exhibit multiple handshakes from 7 different archetypes of the adult African-American Male.

ROCK MOVING ROCKS, JESS PERLITZ
11am – 4pm (ending at the Museum)
The route for the rock will begin near the Hawthorne Bridge moving along the Eastbank Esplanade, over the Tilikum Crossing, ending at the Art Museum.
For a day, along the west shore of the Willamette River in Portland, the artist will be a rock and will move other rocks, engaging with the surrounding world. Inspired by landscape and landscaping, landmarks and monuments, natural disaster and our never ending attempts for control, this piece will be an action that unfolds over the course of 5 hours. The r​ock w​ill have arms and legs available so that it may move other similar objects, rest, and engage with people as needed. The rock does not talk. But it does try to communicate through music, action, and presence. Stay tuned to @jess_perlitz on Twitter for the rock’s whereabouts.

THE DIVISION OF IDENTIFICATION
All day
Throughout the Park Blocks through January 17
These selected portraits are sourced from a volume of police arrest mug shots found in the City of Portland Archives collections.  Created by the Division of Identification, now the Police Identification Division, the photos date between 1947 and 1954. The body of works is presented as a photographic installation in public space that unmasks issues of humanity often camouflaged by social stereotypes and ill-repute of “the other.”  The large scale black and white photographic portraits have been installed throughout the Park Blocks of Downtown Portland the same historic locations where people have been arrested for “vagrancy” or other social crimes. “The Division of Identification” is part of Fallen Fruit of Portland presented by Caldera through a Creative Heights grant from the Oregon Community Foundation. Caldera students will interview the public and each other about reactions to the portraits for broadcast on KBOO.

OFFSITE ACTIVITIES

THE CULTURE OF WE
Saturday, October 24 – Friday, November 13
Wieden+Kennedy Gallery (224 NW 13th Ave. Portland, OR 97209)
The Culture of We showcases the power of creativity through the voices of Caldera students. Caldera mentors and youth will meet with Fallen Fruit at the Portland Art Museum, as they install Paradise, and learn how they curate their exhibitions. Students will then take that learning back to the Wieden+Kennedy Gallery, where they will curate their own student companion exhibition, The Culture of We. Fallen Fruit will develop another custom-designed, apple-themed wallpaper upon which Caldera student work will be displayed. Hung salon-style, artwork will create a dialogue of how the individual contributes to community while reflecting unique youth perspectives, reactions, and inspirations. This exhibition highlights Caldera’s focus on the integration of art and nature and the powerful work Caldera does with special guest artists like Fallen Fruit.

Plus more! Learn more about all of the A Day in Paradise activities times and locations.

 

Public Tour: Seeing Nature
Oct 24 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

Explore the Museum with a docent skilled in bringing art to life.

Public tours depart from the Park Avenue entrance.

Tours are free for members or with Museum admission, and free for children age 17 and younger.

Family Tour: Landscapes in Art
Oct 24 @ 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

Explore the Museum with a docent skilled in bringing art to life.

Tours are free for members or with Museum admission, and free for children age 17 and younger.

Public Tour: Seeing Nature
Oct 24 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Explore the Museum with a docent skilled in bringing art to life.

Public tours depart from the Park Avenue entrance.

Tours are free for members or with Museum admission, and free for children age 17 and younger.

Oct
25
Sun
In Dialogue: Artists, Social Movements, and the Creation of Nature
Oct 25 @ 11:30 am – 1:30 pm

This seminar will consider how environmental social movements, the creation of nature, and the ecological crisis relate to the exhibitions at the Portland Art Museum. We will explore different constructions of a mythic or ideal nature, its impact on social change, and specifically how these processes shape efforts to address climate change. We will also examine the affinity between artists and revolutionaries in creating new realities from their visions as well as our participation in this creative process.

David Osborn is a faculty member at Portland State University and has been involved in a wide variety of social movements. His current interests include movement ecology, the impact of cosmology on social change, and emotional and spiritual relationships to the climate crisis.

Register now Learn more about the “In Dialogue with Nature” series.

Family Tour: Animals in Art
Oct 25 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

Explore the Museum with a docent skilled in bringing art to life.

Tours are free for members or with Museum admission, and free for children age 17 and younger.

Public Tour: Docent Highlights
Oct 25 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Explore the Museum with a docent skilled in bringing art to life.

Public tours depart from the Park Avenue entrance.

Tours are free for members or with Museum admission, and free for children age 17 and younger.

Oct
27
Tue
Public Tour: Paradise
Oct 27 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Explore the Museum with a docent skilled in bringing art to life.

Public tours depart from the Park Avenue entrance.

Tours are free for members or with Museum admission, and free for children age 17 and younger.

Oct
29
Thu
Public Tour: Seeing Nature
Oct 29 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Explore the Museum with a docent skilled in bringing art to life.

Public tours depart from the Park Avenue entrance.

Tours are free for members or with Museum admission, and free for children age 17 and younger.

Lecture: The Nature of Seeing
Oct 29 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon of Arizona at Sunset
Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon of Arizona at Sunset, 1909, Oil on canvas, 30 x 40 inches, Paul G. Allen Family Collection

ART, PERCEPTION, AND THE BRAIN

David Wilson, Director Of The Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University

The eyes are the window for the brain. Yet there are many mysteries about how our brains make sense of what we see and, more specifically, how we perceive art. Join Dr. Wilson for a wide ranging discussion that will explore the brain science behind visual perception, looking at art, and even the ways our brains are wired to see and experience the natural world.

Presented in partnership with Oregon Health & Science University.

SOLD OUT — Standby seating may be available onsite.

Oct
31
Sat
Public Tour: Women in Art
Oct 31 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

Explore the Museum with a docent skilled in bringing art to life.

Public tours depart from the Park Avenue entrance.

Tours are free for members or with Museum admission, and free for children age 17 and younger.

Public Tour: Seeing Nature
Oct 31 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Explore the Museum with a docent skilled in bringing art to life.

Public tours depart from the Park Avenue entrance.

Tours are free for members or with Museum admission, and free for children age 17 and younger.

Nov
1
Sun
CLOSES: Anish Kapoor
Nov 1 all-day
Anish Kapoor, Burgundy Red from the series Shadow IV, 2011
Anish Kapoor (British, born India 1954), Burgundy Red from the series Shadow IV, 2011, Etching, 28 3/16 x 37 5/16 inches, ©Anish Kapoor and Paragon | Contemporary Editions Ltd.

Anish Kapoor: Prints from the Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer features 18 intensely colorful works that were produced by the artist at The Paragon Press, London, and Crown Point Press, San Francisco. Similar to his sculptural work, Kapoor’s prints do not confront viewers with a narrative. Rather, it is a psychological experience of associations facilitated by color and positive and negative spaces.

Organized by the Portland Art Museum and curated by Brian Ferriso, The Marilyn H. and Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Director.

Learn more.

Family Tour: Portland to Paris
Nov 1 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

Explore the Museum with a docent skilled in bringing art to life.

Tours are free for members or with Museum admission, and free for children age 17 and younger.

Lecture: Emmet Gowin – A Life in Photography
Nov 1 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Emmet Gowin and EdithArnold Newman Distinguished Lecture in Photography

Emmet Gowin, Photographer, Professor Emeritus, Princeton University

Join photographer Emmet Gowin as he discusses influences, new subjects and approaches, and the profound love for nature that informs all aspects of his art, including the photographs on view in Force of Nature: Emmet Gowin in the American West. Piercing images of his wife, Edith, abstract aerial views of landscapes marked by nature and humankind, and recent work in South America have earned Gowin worldwide recognition. Since the late 1960s, his photographs have appeared in solo shows at institutions including the Museum of Modern Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Yale University Art Gallery, and Tokyo’s Photo Gallery International. He is the recipient of two National Endowment for the Arts awards, a Guggenheim fellowship, and Princeton University’s President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching. A gifted speaker, Gowin draws large and enthusiastic crowds. This lecture, his first in Portland, is a not-to-be- missed event.

The Arnold Newman Distinguished Lecture in Photography is sponsored by the Arnold & Augusta Newman Foundation.

Purchase tickets
Public Tour: Seeing Nature
Nov 1 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Explore the Museum with a docent skilled in bringing art to life.

Public tours depart from the Park Avenue entrance.

Tours are free for members or with Museum admission, and free for children age 17 and younger.

Nov
3
Tue
Public Tour: American/Northwest
Nov 3 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Explore the Museum with a docent skilled in bringing art to life.

Public tours depart from the Park Avenue entrance.

Tours are free for members or with Museum admission, and free for children age 17 and younger.

FILM: Una Vida
Nov 3 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

 

Director: Richie Adams
US, 2014
(98 min)

Q&A with Dr. Nicolas Bazan to follow screening.

Based on the novel by Dr. Nicolas Bazan, UNA VIDA tells the intimate story of disheartened, grieving neuroscientist Dr. Alvaro Cruz after the death of his mother and the unique relationship he develops with the mesmerizing New Orleans street singer Una Vida as her health declines and her struggle with Alzheimer’s progresses. Bazan strives to find meaning in Una Vida’s fragmented recollections of tantalizing jazz lyrics and spellbinding vocals.

Presented in partnership with the Portland Art Museum’s program artNOW, the NW Film Center, and the Oregon chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association.

Purchase tickets