Pink Martini photo by Chris Hornbecker.

Paige Powell: The Ride
Still from The Ride, 2015, 3-channel color digital projection; 18:42 min., Image courtesy of the artist.

Kenny Scharf, Cosmic Cavern. Courtesy Honor Fraser Gallery. Photo Joshua White/JWPictures.com.
Kenny Scharf, Cosmic Cavern. Courtesy Honor Fraser Gallery. Photo Joshua
White/JWPictures.com.

Pink Martini performs at Paige Powell opening November 4

We’re thrilled to announce an opening reception on November 4 for Paige Powell: The Ride, featuring performances by special guest Pink Martini. Visitors will enjoy special preview access to Paige Powell’s multimedia installation and be immersed in the 1980s New York art scene of Andy Warhol, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Kenny Scharf.

Party-goers will also preview a companion exhibition of Scharf’s installation Cosmic Cavern, which immerses viewers in a day-glo universe densely packed with graffiti tags, detritus, and everyday objects reimagined as cartoon personalities. Both Paige Powell: The Ride and Kenny Scharf: Cosmic Cavern will be on view to the public from November 5, 2015, through February 21, 2016.

Portland native Powell is a native a longtime friend of Pink Martini bandleader Thomas Lauderdale, whose “little orchestra” appears at the Museum fresh off its European tour. The beloved Portland ensemble will keep the opening party hopping with an evening of globe-trotting, genre-crossing music and dancing in the Kridel Grand Ballroom, transporting listeners to the middle of a samba parade in Rio de Janeiro, a French music hall in the 1930s, or a palazzo in Napoli.

6 – 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, November 4. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Tickets to the opening reception on November 4 are $40 and available online in limited quantity until sold out. No-host bar and food. Sorry, we are unable to take phone orders for tickets. All purchases are final. No refunds or exchanges.

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Related Events:

Oct
8
Thu
Educator Workshop: Social-Emotional Learning and the Arts for Meaningful Student Engagement
Oct 8 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Please note: This program was originally scheduled for October 1, but has been moved to October 8. We appreciate your flexibility.

During these difficult times, the core competencies of social-emotional learning have taken on added importance: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making. These are the skills that will help all of us, students and educators alike, to develop internal resilience and to create community even in a remote learning environment. The arts and creative practices can play an important role in developing these skills and can be integrated into many subject areas. Join us for a workshop to explore connections between arts education and SEL competencies for educators in all disciplines and grade levels.

This online workshop will be facilitated by Carolyn Hazel Drake, Portland Public Schools Visual Arts TOSA; Jonathan Hill, cartoonist, illustrator, and educator; and PAM staff.

Register now

We will email you the Zoom link and pre-workshop reading by September 24.

 

Nov
12
Thu
In Dialogue: A Question of Color
Nov 12 @ 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm
In Dialogue: A Question of Color @ Virtual program

This is a virtual program and space is limited.

In Dialogue is an occasional series of interdisciplinary, discussion-based sessions that explore art on view at the Museum in relation to works in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. This fall, we will take inspiration from Art and Race Matters: The Career of Robert Colescott to consider timely and key exhibition themes that explore the dynamics between race and gender, as well as the function of satire within the work. This In Dialogue series is supported by Cheryl and Rena Tonkin, and Marv Tonkin Leasing Company, In Memory of Alan Baron Tonkin.

Facilitated by Dr. Ethan Johnson, this In Dialogue will center discussion around the film, A Question of Color, and the ways in which colorism occurs within the Colescott exhibition. Ethan Johnson is an associate professor in and chair of the Black Studies Department in the School of Gender, Race and Nations at Portland State University.  He received his doctorate from the Social and Cultural Studies in Education Program at the University of California, Berkeley.  He has published in various journals such as Race, Ethnicity and EducationThe International Journal of Qualitative Studies in EducationSouls, Ethnography and Education and The Oregon Historical Quarterly.  He has also co-edited the book called Education and the Black Diaspora: Educational Perspectives, Challenges and Prospects.

He works across multiple fields of study related to the experiences of people of African descent: education, popular culture, race and racism, history and African Diaspora Studies.  Currently, he is working on a number of projects.  One examines the educational experiences of Afro-Latin@s in Spain and the other focuses on the significance of complexion and phenotype in the lives of Black males living in Portland for which he has an article coming out this year.  Professor Johnson is the host and organizer of the Black Bag Speaker Series whose mission is to create a space on campus in which scholars and/or activists doing work that relates to people of African descent in Portland and the nation can engage with the university and community.

Reserve tickets
Dec
10
Thu
In Dialogue: Satire in the Work of Robert Colescott
Dec 10 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

This is a virtual program and space is limited.

In Dialogue is an occasional series of interdisciplinary, discussion-based sessions that explore art on view at the Museum in relation to works in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. This fall, we will take inspiration from Art and Race Matters: The Career of Robert Colescott to consider timely and key exhibition themes that explore the dynamics between race and gender, as well as the function of satire within the work. This In Dialogue series is supported by Cheryl and Rena Tonkin, and Marv Tonkin Leasing Company, In Memory of Alan Baron Tonkin.

In an evening of discussion based around improvisational performance with Broke Gravy, this In Dialogue considers the function of satire both within Colescott’s work and within daily life. Broke Gravy uses improv comedy and storytelling to discover truth between the blurry lines of the daily grind.

As three black men living in America, they utilize their unique voices to spark thoughtful conversations on and off comedy stages. Through an open and honest dialogue, they exchange their experiences with those of their audience—exploring deeper perspectives on comedy, relationships, and humanity.

Also, they’re funny AF.

Learn more about Broke Gravy at www.brokegravy.com.

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