Charlene Vickers: the map is not the territory

Charlene Vickers: the map is not the territory

 
 
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On this episode of the Portland Art Museum Podcast, we present the audio interview of Charlene Vickers, edited only for pauses in the conversation and chatter between Charlene and the interviewer. The other voice you will hear is Grace Kook-Anderson, the Arlene and Harold Schnitzer of Northwest Art and curator of the map is not the territory.

Charlene Vickers
(b. 1970 in Kenora, Ontario; lives in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada)
Charlene Vickers is an Anishnabe artist based in Vancouver. Raised in Toronto, Vickers explores her Ojibwe ancestry through painting, sculpture, and performance exploring memory, healing, and embodied connections to ancestral lands.

Interested in the exhibition and relevant programs? Visit portlandartmuseum.org/exhibitions/the-map-is-not-the-territory/

A sampling of Charlene’s work can be see at Portland Art Museum through May 5, 2019. See Charlene present at Portland Art Museum as part of a PechaKucha talk from February 10, 2019 here – https://youtu.be/nTbsHiI5sZA?t=2574

Mentioned in this episode:
Diviners Protection Performance – youtu.be/WpTAKYYlX0o
wikipedia.org/wiki/Norval_Morrisseau
artnet.com/artists/arthur-shilling
wikipedia.org/wiki/Emily_Carr_University_of_Art_and_Design
sfu.ca/sca.html
wikipedia.org/wiki/Jingle_dress
charlenevickersvisualartist.blogspot.com/2018/08/jingles-and-sounds-for-speaking-to-our.html


Want to submit an idea for a future episode of the podcast? Fill out the form at pam.to/podcastidea – if your idea fits within the scope of the Museum’s mission, we can work together to bring it to life.

A transcript of this episode can be found at portlandartmuseum.org/podcast

Interested in learning more about Portland Art Museum’s exhibitions and programs? Visit portlandartmuseum.org and follow us on social media:
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